, January 17 2011

Mobify Network Stats Q4 2010

We've spent some time combing through our analytics data for Q4 2010. Over the next few days we'll share some of the key nuggets that we've extracted from the data set. In terms of overall trends, we've seen a lot of growth across our network in 2010. From September to December we saw 41% growth in pageviews from European visitors and 36% growth from North American visitors. This reflects both an increase in traffic to individual Mobify subscribers and the ongoing expansion of the Mobify network. We'll start today with relative device data.

We've heard a lot of announcements from various mobile data sources concerning the relative traffic from different mobile device operating systems. Here's what we're seeing on our network.

The graphs above show relative OS share in pageview requests for the Americas and for Europe. In both cases, the four operating systems shown in the graphs account for more than 90% of all page views. The iOS operating system (iPhone and iPod) remains the dominant OS across the Mobify network accounting for half or more of all page requests. Otherwise browser share is relatively steady. There is a small contraction in BlackBerry pageviews in North America, and slow growth in Android pageviews in both Europe and North America. Although other variations are noticeable, they aren't large enough to draw any conclusions.

, August 27 2010

Mobify Weekly - Special Mobile Metrics

Hello everyone and welcome to a special issue off Mobify Weekly! This week we look at some articles that feature mobile web stats, starting off with one of our own!

Mobile Web Visitor Behaviour by Device Number of clicks, pageviews and duration of stay are interdependent with the type of device the user is on and, of course, the website. We look at these and some other cool metrics in our report.

Android Mobile Web Use Up 400% in Q2, Outpacing Apple & BlackBerry Android's rate of traffic growth is staggering. As the overall market continues to grow, both web and app use are continuing to climb. Traffic stats courtesy of UK mobile analytics firm Bango.

Mobile Web traffic grows, not slows, during summer What only seems logical (people don't spend as much time at home and, therefore, have to be surfing the web on their mobile devices) would seem common sense if only the numbers didn't reflect a much larger curve: one where there is exponential growth in mobile website visitors. People are browsing the web more everyday!

Smartphones Propel Mobile Net Use. Stats confirm what everyone's thinking. A good portion of us can't go a day without browsing the mobile web. eMarketer thinks that rougly 28 percent of the U.S. population accesses the web on their phone everyday. Metrics by AdWeek.

Have a great weekend and see you all next week!

, August 23 2010

Mobile web visitor behaviour by device, -part 1-

There's been a lot of buzz on the internet about the growth of Android web traffic, but to date we haven't seen a lot of discussion about the different browsing behaviours of users with these handsets.  We've selected some graphs showing relative browsing behaviours on five sites off the Mobify network, each of which get at least a million mobile page views per month.

In each of the graphs, we've sorted by the number of page views per visit of the mobile operating system.  To the right we also show the breakdown of the operating system as a percentage of site traffic.  Note -- we have filtered out all other browsers than the ones listed above so this percentage is relative only between the browsers shown.

Sites A, B and C are blogs with a technology or geek appeal.  Sites D and E focus on celebrities and celebrity news. We can clearly see the impact of site content on the types of devices used to view content.   The difference in the audiences is notable in the percentage of the visits -- the technology sites are dominated by iPhone and Android, with Blackberry accounting for an average of around 5% of traffic.  BlackBerry is a big player on the celeb sites though, coming in around 30% of total visits, slightly higher than Android.  The celeb sites also feature the lowest percentage of iPhone users, although iPhone users remain the most common type of web visitor.

More interesting is what behaviours are preserved even though the audiences are quite different. Android handset owners tend to dominate page views, averaging about 1.25 page views for every page viewed by an iPhone visitor across these sites. Almost across the board, iPhone users are the least likely to stick around. We're still slicing and dicing data to see if we can find an answer as to why, but it's definitely a pattern we see, and across a diverse number of sites.

Takeaways

Designing a great mobile site requires may require making some tradeoffs for your audience.  For sites with less technology oriented visitors, there is still a strong payoff in spending the time to optimize the site for non-touch devices that may have limited support for javascript and CSS.  This landscape is clearly changing, with RIM's latest BlackBerry Torch offering an powerful browser that stacks up well against other smartphones on the market, but it will take at least a year for these devices to significantly displace existing devices.

Furthermore, despite AdMob's announcement that Android is king for mobile web traffic, on our network we're still seeing iPhone as the dominant player on the mobile web, though Android has posted solid gains in the past 6 months.  However, if Android users continue to show such strong site loyalty, they may be the most attractive visitors for advertising dollars in the months ahead.

There's been a lot of buzz about [the growth of Android web traffic][], but to date we haven't seen a lot of discussion about the different browsing behaviours of mobile web visitors with these handsets.  In this first post we'll start the process of exploring how the type of mobile handset used affects mobile web behaviour.

We've selected some sites to show relative browsing behaviours on five sites off our network.  The sites have been randomly selected, however each of them receive a minimum of one million mobile page views per month.  In each of the graphs below, we've sorted by the number of page views per visit of the mobile operating system.  To the right we also show the breakdown of the operating system as a percentage of site traffic.  Note -- we have filtered out all other browsers than the ones listed above so this percentage is relative only between the browsers shown.

Site A

Site A - Technology blog

Site B

Site B - Technology Blog

Site C

Site C - Technology Blog

Site D

Site D - Celeb news

Site E

Site E - Celeb news

Sites A, B and C are blogs with a technology appeal.  Sites D and E focus on celebrities and celebrity news. We can clearly see the impact of site content on the types of devices used to view content.  The technology sites are dominated by iPhone and Android, with Blackberry accounting for an average of only about 5% of traffic.  BlackBerry is a big player on the celeb sites though, coming in around 30% of total visits, slightly higher than Android.  The celeb sites also feature the lowest percentage of iPhone users, although iPhone users remain the most common type of web visitor.

More interesting is what behaviours are preserved even though the audiences are quite different. Android handset owners tend to dominate page views, averaging about 1.25 page views for every page viewed by an iPhone visitor across these sites. Almost across the board, iPhone users are the least likely to stick around. We're still slicing and dicing data to see if we can find an answer as to why, but it's definitely a pattern we see, and across a diverse number of sites.

Takeaways

Designing a great mobile site requires may require making some tradeoffs for your audience.  For sites with less technology oriented visitors, there is still a strong payoff in spending the time to optimize the site for non-touch devices that may have limited support for javascript and CSS.  This landscape is clearly changing, with RIM's latest BlackBerry Torch offering an powerful browser that stacks up well against other smartphones on the market, but it will take at least a year for these devices to significantly displace existing devices.

Furthermore, despite AdMob's announcement that Android is king for mobile web traffic, on our network we're still seeing iPhone as the dominant player on the mobile web, though Android has posted solid gains in the past 6 months.  If Android usage continues to grow as a percentage of mobile web (and we expect it will!) and Android visitors continue to show such strong site loyalty, they may be the most attractive visitors for mobile web advertising spending in the months ahead.

, June 3 2010

Nielsen Publishes Study on Mobile App Stats

In their new report, Nielsen has surveyed 4,200 people in the US who have downloaded an app on their smartphone in the last 30 days. Games were the most popular category with social networking, news, weather, and navigation trailing not far behind.

21% of American wireless subscribers have a smartphone at Q4 2009, up from 19% in the previous quarter and significantly higher than the 14% at the end of 2008

With smartphone use on the rise, we expect mobile browsing traffic numbers to grow as well. While native applications are experiencing high download rates, mobile web is picking up steam across many fronts, notably m-commerce.

Facebook App leads the popularity charts across all platforms except Android where it got overtaken by Google Maps.

iPhones: Facebook (58%), iTunes (48%), Google Maps (47%)

Android: Google Maps (67%), Facebook (50%), Weather Channel (38%)

Blackberry: Facebook (51%), Google Maps(34%), Weather Channel (28%)

, November 4 2009

Google Analytics for Mobile

Google Analytics has improved support for mobile device tracking and we couldn't be more excited about it!  The new analytics tracking works on all mobile devices, including devices that do not support javascript.  The result is high accuracy analytics for mobile web traffic.

We're happy to announce that Mobify has integrated these new Google Analytics features.  Adding Google analytics for mobile will take about 10 minutes if you don't yet have a Google Analytics account, or about 5 if you do.  To use Google Analytics for mobile, add a new profile for your mobile domain in Google Analytics (you'll have to sign up for free if you haven't already).  If you want your mobile page views to be distinct from your desktop hits it's important that you select 'Add a Profile for a new domain'.  Enter your mobile domain name into the form (you've created and added a DNS cname for your Mobify mobile view, right?).

For the last step, go to Mobify and select your site from the Dashboard.

On the services screen, enter the Mobile analytics id provided to you by Google.  Don't forget to change the start of the analytics id, UA-, to mobile, MO-.

After you've entered your mobile analytics key, it can take Google Analytics 12-24 hours to detect the new traffic.

We're happy to announce that Mobify has integrated these new Google Analytics features.  To use Google Analytics for mobile, add a new profile for your mobile domain in Google Analytics (you'll have to sign up if you haven't already).  If you want your mobile page views to be distinct from your desktop hits it's important that you select 'Add a Profile for a new domain'.  Enter your mobile domain name into the form (you have a cname for your mobile domain, right?).

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